In Remembrance

How is your memory? I heard of an older couple that was having some trouble remembering so they signed up to take a memory course together. A few months later the husband was out working in his garden when a neighbor stopped by and began to talk to him about the memory course, what was the name of the instructor? The husband paused, then asked “What is the name of that flower that smells so nice but has thorns? You mean a rose the neighbor answered. Yeah, that’s it, “Hey Rose, what’s the name of that guy who taught us the memory course?” How is your memory?

It is impossible to remember everything. How many things have you forgotten recently? When was the last time you forgot a loved one’s birthday? When was the last time you lost your keys? When was the last time you forgot to return a phone call? Is there some secondary person in your life you don’t call by name because you forgot their name? Have you ever forgotten to get milk at the store or to pick up a youngster from school? Have you ever forgotten where you parked at the stadium or the grocery store? You can admit it. We have all forgotten something. Sometimes, it doesn’t matter. For example, I can never remember Ronald Reagan’s first wife. Sometimes, it does matter. Don’t forget to file your taxes by April 18. This evening we remember an event that you must never forget.

It is imperative that you remember Jesus’ last Seder. Our primary scripture is First Corinthians 11:23-26. It would be his last meal before his appointment with the cross. For it is at that meal, Jesus gave us a memorial for the ages. You know the scene. We have reenacted it. It has been reenacted in movies and inspirited some of the greatest pieces of art. That makes it easy to imagine this evening’s lesson. The Gospels tell us, the disciples were wondering about the Passover meal. This is not shocking. It was the reason they came to Jerusalem. They had been observing the Passover meal annually since childhood. Jesus sends two of the disciples ahead to make the arrangements. When Jesus arrived, everything was ready in that upper room. The menu for the meal was traditional. Each course represented something from the story of the exile. Every word was scripted. No one dared change a single word, but Jesus did change the words. Instead, of just remembering the past, Jesus began to talk about the future. He began to speak of the future when he would be separated from his disciples. We know the words that he uttered because we are his contemporary disciples. The bread represents his body. The wine represents his blood. He gave us those elements for one reason. He did not want to be forgotten. Remembering Jesus is extremely important. On Maundy Thursday we need to remember three things.

First, we need to remember past events! Did you know in the state of Ohio there are 1,750 historical markers? Each one has been placed by the Ohio Historical Society. That program started in the 1950s. I think my father read every one. It used to drive me crazy when I was young. Now I read as many as I can. Time changes things. Did you know there are 16 historical markers within the zip code of this church? Maybe you have seen them? Has anyone read the marker at the old The Mahoning Dispatch Building or the one at the Pioneer Pavilion? Each one exists for the same reason. They don’t want you to forget the past.

The disciples observed that annual Seder to remember past events. It was a meal designed to remember the past. It was a meal designed to teach the youngest about their past. Each participant heard the story again. Their ancestors were held in bondage in Egypt. They had no hope of liberation, so God sent them a liberator. His name was Moses. He spoke on behalf of God to the Pharaoh and announced a series of plagues. Each one was miserable. There was the plagues of blood, frogs, gnats, flies, livestock, boils, hail, locust and darkness. However, the last plague was the worst, the plague on the first born. It was that plague that changed the heart of Pharaoh. He released the Hebrews. We remember because there are events that should not be forgotten. It is not just true of them. It is true of us. We should never forget the events of that upper room. We remember because of past events are important. We remember because past events hold lessons.

Second, we need to remember past lessons! Someone asked me recently, “What is the worst thing about traveling?” I think he wanted to hear about bad food and lumpy beds. Instead, I told him about airport security. If you have traveled in the past twenty-plus years you know it is true. It is part of the day. You take off your shoes. You take off your belt. You empty your pockets. You show your boarding pass and passport. You step into the machine to get x-rayed, and you are patted down by someone who needs a breath mint. It is annoying, but I never complain. Why? You know the answer. We have learned from the past. September 11 changed our world. Someone once said, “Growing up is learning from yesterday’s mistakes.”  How many times have you said, “I will never do that again!” We remember so we don’t make the same mistakes again. We remember because of past events are important. We remember because past events hold lessons. We remember because those events remind us of our core values.

Third, we need to remember our core values. The Seder is designed to help people remember the past. However, the Seder is designed to do more. It was designed to remember past values. The Seder is an annual reminder to the Jews that their relationship with God is unique. They call themselves “God’s Chosen People.” It is a statement that is hard to argue with when you remember the events in the wilderness. Pharaoh had changed his mind and sent his army to retrieve the slaves. Moses had led the people to the shore of the Red Sea. Things looked bad. The people could not go back because of the army. The people could not go forward because of the water. They were trapped and they had no hope. However, they are God Chosen people, so God divided the waters for them. The water was held back for the Hebrews but not the Egyptians. It is not just a story of a miracle; it is a reminder that they are special. When they remember it; they remember their core values.

When we partake of the body and the blood of Christ you are not just remember some past event. You are remembering our core values. You have a unique relationship with God. You are a disciple of Jesus Christ!

The Taj Mahal in Agra, India is considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The history is interesting. It was built in the 1600’s by the fifth Mughal emperor, Shah Jahah. He built it as a memorial for his wife, Mumtaz Hahal. The building, itself, is truly an amazing. It is an octagonal building with walls measuring 130 feet long by 70 ‘high and it is surmounted by a dome adding an addition 120’ in height. It is constructed entirely out of white marble, which is reflected by a huge pool. The interior design is magnificent, containing 12 types of inlaid stones, and mosaics of great beauty. Many consider the Maj Mahal the greatest memorial in the world today. They are wrong!

 The greatest memorial today is found at the communion table of every church. It is the body and the blood of Christ. When we come to the communion table we remember. In is important that we remember past events. It is important that we remember past lessons. It is important that we remember our core values. We have a special relationship with God. We are disciples of Jesus Christ! Saint John Bosco (1815-1888) once said, “We do not go to Holy Communion because we are good; we go to become good.”